Layers in my hull, boat made in 2013. What if there is a leak?

yogi799

Member
Hey guys, question that has been on my mind for 10 years now. I installed a fishfinder transducer on my transom, about 30 inches to the right of my outdrive, near the edge of the hull, as shown in pic, maybe 5 inches above the edge. It has been attached since I got the boat new , in 2013. No problems. I drilled the holes back then, squeezed some silicone or whatevere glue was recommendedd into the 3 holes, siliconed the crap out of it and screwed the bracket to the hull using the holes i made. However i attached it, i do not see any protruding screws in my bilge/engine compartment, from the inside of the boat. I think the provided screws were like 1.25 inches so with the bracket's depths, they might be 1 inch inside.

Since then, it kept bugging me... if there was a tiny leak thru these 3 holes, if the silicone did not fill the holes completely, am I risking anything? Boat was usually around 20-25 days in the water per season (mostly stored on land when not used), and i never saw a problem, but how could I , since the water seeping inside would not be visible to me. This year is different, for the first time ever, the boat will be stored for 90 days in a marina, so the bracket will be submerged all the time.

What is my hull cross section? Is there some possible seepage inside that i cannot see? Is there wood in there that could be slowly rottening IF i have a tiny leak? If no wood is present (hull if fiberglass of course), what else couldd happen at worst, could the water be collecting deep inside the structure of my hull? Is me storeing the boat for many more days in the water starting this year presenting a new level of risk (only asking IF there is small invisible water inflitration). Pro advice appreciated. Again, boat is from 2013 Sunesta 244.

Attaching two files to show location of the transducer. many many thanks for your expertise.
 

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Doc

Liquid Addiction
Staff member
I am no expert. I was looking at a boat model that was known to have rotting stringers. No easy way to eyeball them to see. A moisture meter was recomended to see if the stringers had moisture. This would give me a clue if they were in the process of rotting out. I suspect a moisture meter would do the same for you. It would show the issue if you have one.
 
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Iggy

Active member
If that that worried about it. Take the transducer off and remount it. Personally, I would not have used silicone. 4000 fast cure would do a better job.
 

yogi799

Member
Not that worried, it's been 10 years lol. I might have used something might better, I used whatever was recommended, just don't remember now.

Yeah, i was asking if there is some material inside my hull that can rot, or is it all fiberglass?
 

Denny

Well-known member
Gold Site Supporter
Like Doc & Iggy say, first step, moisture meter, that will tell you if you have an issue. For me, the only thing that I will use under the water line is 3M 5200.
 
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yogi799

Member
Ok sure. But how? How will the moisture meter be used in this case?? Thru the fiberglass? Lol. Or you're saying I have to take the transducer bracket off, remove the screws and stick some probe in there??
 

Iggy

Active member
Its a meter that you place over the spot. Some have points/pins for wood. A good one is in the $120 to 200 range.
 

Denny

Well-known member
Gold Site Supporter
It will read thru the glass. Go to a place that does boat repairs, and they should be able to test it for you. You don't have to take anything apart.
 
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Iggy

Active member
If your up north, what you don't want is the water to freeze. That would only damage the glass inside.
 
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