Serentiy

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Night time on the beautiful Ottawa river. Just waiting to light the campfire and bust out the rum and guitars
 

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SST

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Nice picture. We've had such a nice Indian Summer it's amazing. How I wish I had my boat available this past week. But, with what I had to face, it's better in storage than home.
 
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Where is your Ottawa River?
The river is the border between the province of Ontario and Quebec. This pic was taken from the shore on the Quebec side just downstream of a town called Deep River that was established in the early 1940's to house the scientists who came from England and around the world to develop nuclear power in Canada at the Chalk River nuclear research labs which are situated just downstream from Deep River. I worked there for 35+ years developing and testing different types of nuclear reactor fuel for both research and power reactors.

"Our" particular unobstructed section of the river spans Pembroke, Ontario to the Power dam at Rolphton Ontario. But the entire navigable waterway runs from just west of Ottawa to Lake Témiscaming, in northern Ontario/Quebec. There are trucks with hydraulic trailers that can take a boat of up to about 32 ft. in length around the various dams...for a price.

 
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Denny

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Thanks for sharing, it looks pretty wide. Is it all navigable ?
Where does it enter the St. Lawrence river.
 

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Thanks for sharing, it looks pretty wide. Is it all navigable ?
Where does it enter the St. Lawrence river.
Always happy to share our little slice of heaven with others. :)

It is reasonably wide. Typically a mile or more. Just depends on the location. It's navigable pretty much the entire route with a few exceptions for rapids and dams that can easily be trailered around.

Just west of Ottawa I believe, you'd have to get pulled out again and trailered around the Chaudiere falls then dropped back into the river (probably near the Casino de Lac Leamy on the Quebec shore across from the Parliament buildings) in order continue on the river east of Ottawa to Montreal.

Alternately, you could forego heading to Montreal and instead, access the flight locks at the entrance to the historic Rideau Canal which goes from Ottawa all the way to Kingston on Lake Ontario. There you could continue and play in all of the Great Lakes or, take the Trent-Severn canal at Trenton on lake Ontario and head north to Georgian Bay. So many options from the Ottawa.

The Ottawa River was actually considered by the early French explorers, to be the gateway to the Canadian "interior" because it got them into the Great Lakes via the French river in Northern Ontario and thereby, a good part of the way across the continent. Samuel de Champlain explored much of it (including our area) in the 1600's.

Most of the river where I am located would be considered "wilderness" boating with only a handful of small marinas along the way offering showers, fuel, water and pump out and a handful of overnight slips. No service opportunities at those marinas but there are marine dealers in each of those towns that can do the work. For those who prefer "dock to dock" boating, they would be disappointed. If you like to anchor a few feet off the beach in sand (at least on our segment), then it's perfect. Once you get above the dam at Rolphton, Ontario its pretty much Canadian shield and rocks and trees to the water's edge.

As for your last question, the Ottawa empties into the St.Lawrence just east of Hawksbury, Ontario which is about an hour + drive (highway) east of Ottawa and about 1/2 hour west of Montreal.
 
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Denny

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Thank you again for sharing. Years ago my one son and I made two separate trips to Canada. The first was to visit The Thousand Islands on the St. Lawrence river. Starting from Kingston and going to Montreal. We made it as far as Cornwall. Farther up north a freighter hit it's anchor while waiting to go through one of the locks and put a hole in it's bottom, and backed logged the transit system. So we went back to Kingston, pulled my girl and trailered her to Montreal, and boated around there for a couple of days.

The next trip was to Lake Superior, Georgian Bay, The French River, The Benjamin Islands, The apposable Islands, and The Trent Severn Trail, and went up The big Chute, what an amazing adventure that was.

My girl and I have been going to Canada for 30 years now, Right now we travel The St. Clair River and the tributaries that connect to it.
The thing I love about most of your water ways, is you leave it to nature.
 

Sandbar

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Thank you again for sharing. Years ago my one son and I made two separate trips to Canada. The first was to visit The Thousand Islands on the St. Lawrence river. Starting from Kingston and going to Montreal. We made it as far as Cornwall. Farther up north a freighter hit it's anchor while waiting to go through one of the locks and put a hole in it's bottom, and backed logged the transit system. So we went back to Kingston, pulled my girl and trailered her to Montreal, and boated around there for a couple of days.

The next trip was to Lake Superior, Georgian Bay, The French River, The Benjamin Islands, The apposable Islands, and The Trent Severn Trail, and went up The big Chute, what an amazing adventure that was.

My girl and I have been going to Canada for 30 years now, Right now we travel The St. Clair River and the tributaries that connect to it.
The thing I love about most of your water ways, is you leave it to nature.
Glad you enjoyed your trips. :) Did you happen to check out Boldt Castle in the 1,000 islands while you were there? It's quite the place and the back story is fascinating too.
 

Denny

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Glad you enjoyed your trips. :) Did you happen to check out Boldt Castle in the 1,000 islands while you were there? It's quite the place and the back story is fascinating too.
No, we were on our way to Montreal, but did stop to look and take pictures. What a beautiful area and what a beautiful castle. Would love to read about the history of it, I will look it up on the web. thank you for passing that on.
 

Denny

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Nice, great time of year, no one else around, you have your own private lake. Just curious, was that rock on the port side originally under water?
 

Iggy

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Just for kicks! My dog on my wife's lap.
 

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